Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Emoji Prints


4th grade students recently finished a Pop Art inspired printmaking lesson.  We began by talking about Pop Art, an art movement that began in the 1950's.  Artists made work inspired by popular culture and every day life. 


We viewed examples of work by a few artists, including Andy Warhol.  We noticed that Warhol used repeated imagery and bright colors in his work.  We then learned a bit about printmaking, an art technique that allows us to make multiple copies, or prints, of our work.  Students would be creating their own Pop Art prints, inspired by something popular today: emoji's!

Marilyn Monroe, by Andy Warhol
Students started by creating sketches of different emoji faces.  We had a reference sheet that we could borrow ideas from, or students were allowed to invent their own.  After drawing six different emoji's, students chose their favorite one to use for our printmaking project.  They redrew their emoji onto larger paper, and then transferred it onto foam.  The foam would be our "printing plate", which we would later ink and print onto paper.  Any lines drawn, or imprinted, into the foam don't get inked - leaving behind empty spaces on your paper.


We practiced pulling our first set of prints using a brayer and black ink.  Before rolling ink onto their plate, students listened for a sticky sound and made sure ink filled their roller evenly.  We then applied ink to our printing plate and laid colored paper on top.  Students gently rubbed their paper to create a print, carefully pulling the paper away when ready.





Students spent a few class sessions making prints using various colored inks and papers.  Once we had a collection of prints, students chose their best work to mount onto black paper.   We thought about choosing a variety of colors, as well as which prints were most successful to us.  Before gluing our prints down, we tried different layouts that would create balance in our work.



Once our work was mounted, we signed our name and gave our work a unique title.  Students participated in a gallery walk, giving us a chance to see everyone's hard work and creativity.  We then talked as a group to share things we noticed during the walk.  Many students gave compliments to one another on creating interesting work or titles.  We also noticed that no two projects looked the same, even if students chose the same emoji.





Below are examples of our finished work:

Lucia - Ms. Barry
Morgan - Ms. Gallagher

Connor - Ms. Gallagher

Joseph - Ms. Gallagher

Lucas - Ms. Gallagher

Alen - Ms. Gallagher

Gracie - Ms. Barry

Jad - Ms. Barry

Ellen - Ms. Barry

Arianna - Ms. Barry

Francesca - Ms. Barry
Brenda - Ms. Gallagher
Tyler - Ms. Barry
Danica - Ms. Gallagher
Gigi - Ms. Gallagher

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Pet Portraits by Third Grade


Third grade students recently created Pet Portraits out of air dry clay.

Joni, cat - Ms. Munger

We began our lesson by using play-dough to make pets, giving us a chance to practice modeling techniques and brainstorm ideas ahead of time.  Some pets we might actually have, while others were dream pets!


Students spent the following class creating their clay pet portraits.  The previous week we had learned how to make various shapes and forms when working with clay, including spheres, coils, and slabs.  These simple shapes can help you do so many things with your clay!


We used a little water on our finger to smooth out cracks or dry spots in the clay.  We also made sure to "scratch attach" (also known as scoring) any clay pieces together with a toothbrush and water.  This is important in creating a strong bond, otherwise attachments will fall right off.  Students could add texture or details using a wooden stylus.



During the next class, students painted their pet portraits, which had dried and hardened over the week.  We mixed unique colors using our amazing color mixing knowledge.  The following week we glazed our clay using Mod Podge, which adds shine and helps protect the paint.





We ended our project by creating observational drawings of our clay pets.  Many students remembered observational drawing from last year, when we did a still life painting of fruit.  We then did a "gallery walk", giving students a chance to see the hard work and creativity of their classmates.







Here are some examples of our finished work:

Dante, dog - Ms. Park

Yolanda, panda bear - Ms. Dileso

Angelina, frog - Ms. Park

Sydney, narwhal - Ms. Dileso

Emma, dog - Ms. Dileso

Azara, owl - Ms. Dileso

Kingston, cat - Ms. Dileso

Alexa, dog - Ms. Park

Maddox, snail - Ms. Park
Sylvia, dog - Ms. Dileso

Alex, ocelot - Ms. Park

Debora, dog - Ms. Park

Ella, bird - Ms. Park

Adrianna, cat - Ms. Park

Tayvon, bird - Ms. Park

Anthony, snake - Ms. Munger

Edward, dog - Ms. Munger

Roya, cat - Ms. Munger

Victoria, dog - Ms. Dileso

Nour, bear - Ms. Munger